Roger Federer: ‘It’s in the mix that I find the resources for…’

Starting the season with the Sydney title, Roger Federer finally took another step forward and reached the top 10 in May after the first Masters 1000 crown in Hamburg. Following his most significant result in a race outside of the Grand Slams, Roger lost ground in the following months, failing to claim a victory at Roland Garros and Wimbledon and losing his place among the elite after a series of starts. early. The Swiss made it to the fourth round of the US Open, giving him some confidence before winning the fourth ATP title in Vienna in October and returning to the top 10 and becoming a contender in the ATP Race to Shanghai. He playing in Madrid as number one in the world. On July 7, Roger defeated Marcelo Ríos 6-4, 6-2 in the first round to make a winning start, looking for another deep run like in Vienna and more points on his account in the pursuit of first place in the Masters Cup. “I feel very good with Shanghai, it is great to be back in the race. I was tenth and now I am seventh after winning Vienna. I am also in the highest position of my career, surpassing the eighth place I occupied after the title in Hamburg. I am enjoying tennis at the moment because lately I have had some difficulties with a lack of confidence and problems on and off the court, with my dying friend. I went through difficult times and I am happy that it is going uphill again.”

Federer had his knee operated on this year

Renowned sports journalist Christopher Clarey, who is the New York Times tennis writer, recently published a book on Roger Federer titled ‘The Master: The Brilliant Career of Roger Federer’. The biography chronicles the life of Federer by taking the help of places he lived at and the people who made an influence in his life. It was the year 2012. Clarey met Federer after the latter was on his maiden South American exhibition tour. As eager as ever, the Swiss Maestro waved to some excited fans who ran towards the car. “It happens very quickly. You’re just, ‘I’m done. I don’t want to do it anymore. I’m tired of it all.’ And really, that’s what I try to avoid by having the proper schedule and the proper fun and the proper change, because, like you mentioned, if you do the same thing, it doesn’t matter what you do, too many times, all the time, too often you get bored of it,” explained Federer. “It doesn’t matter how extraordinary your life might be, so that’s where I think these kinds of trips, or a good buildup practice session or a great vacation or some amazing tournaments in a row, toughing it out, whatever it might be, it’s in the mix that I find the resources for more, the energy for more.” 

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